Author: Mike Overstreet

Message Slides – 09.20.2020

CAMPFIRE STORIES | Wk 4: “The Merchant & The Pearl”

Pastor Mike Overstreet | 09.20.2020

Message recordings available at: https://vimeo.com/element3

 

1:

CampfireStories__MERCHANT PEARL

 

2:

THE FOUR PARABLE GROUND RULES:

First Rule – The parables create _____ between something that’s relatable to Jesus’ 1st century Jewish audience & Jesus’ identity, mission, & the Kingdom of God.

ANSWER: Parallels

 

Second Rule – The parable’s purpose isn’t to give us clear answers, it’s to make us _____.

ANSWER: Wrestle

 

Third Rule – The parables are universal & timeless in their truths; their content is highly _____

ANSWER: Contextual.

 

Fourth Rule – The parables are always meant to be _____ in a way that demands a response from the audience.

ANSWER: Provocative.

 

3:

Metamorphosis

 

4:

Shaun of the Dead

 

5:

An American Werewolf

 

6:

Matthew 13:45-46 (NIV)

45 “Again, the kingdom of heaven is like a merchant looking for fine pearls. 46 When he found one of great value, he went away and sold everything he had and bought it.

 

7:

The Merchant & the Pearl

  • The Merchant (emporos) – negative title tied to greed, untrustworthiness, & swindling
  • The Pearls – luxury item tied to the uber wealthy & spiritually unclean

 

8:

The merchant has found what he wanted, although until the moment of the find, he did not realize his true desire. He has reconceptualized both his past values and his future plans; the ‘magnitude of the life change’ is paramount; he is no longer what he was.” – Amy-Jill Levine

 

9:

“‘Stinking thinking’ is the universal addiction. Substance addictions like alcohol and drugs are merely the most visible form of addiction, but actually we are all addicted to our own habitual way of doing anything, our own defenses, and most especially, our patterned way of thinking.Richard Rohr

 

10:

Transformation in the Kingdom of God requires…

  1. A willingness to seek.
  2. That we name our pearls (our cycles of addiction).
  3. That we go all-in on a new source of ultimate concern.
  4. A surrendering of our identity.

Going Deeper – 09.20.2020

GOING DEEPER

09.20.2020 | CAMPFIRE STORIES | Wk 4: “The Merchant & The Pearl”

Join the community and go deeper with this Bible study.

 

Breaking Ground

What is your most valuable possession? Why do you consider it so valuable?

 

The Dig

Read Matthew 13:45-46. As mentioned in Sunday’s message, this parable begins provocatively. For Jesus’ 1st century Jewish audience, a merchant was a vocation tied to greed, deception, & often ambivalence towards God’s Law; while pearls were associated with the spiritually unclean. 

Why do you think Jesus begins this parable with this character seeking out these specific items? How would this have hit Jesus’ audience? 

The Merchant ultimately finds one, exquisite pearl & sells everything he has to obtain it. This is both the wrong result of his initial search (he set out seeking many pearls) & a foolish move for someone in his trade. 

Why do you think the Merchant behaves in this way? 

Notice, the parable does not compare the Kingdom of Heaven to the Merchant or the Pearl. Instead, it compares it to the act of seeking & resulting impact of the Merchant’s seeking. 

What role does seeking play in the Kingdom of Heaven & the spiritual life?

What do you make of the fact that Merchant started out seeking the wrong things, but ultimately finds what is truly of value for himself through that journey? 

At the end of the parable, the Merchant, having sold all he has to gain this new pearl, stops being a Merchant. He no longer holds the traits or goods necessary to take part in that vocation. It is a transformation of his identity. 

What roles does surrendering our identity & what we’ve collected over the course of our lives play in the Kingdom of Heaven, transformation, & spiritual life? 

Close by finding yourself in this parable. 

How are you like the Merchant? What is an unhealthy identity that you carry that you need to let go of? 

What are your pearls? What do you find yourself constantly seeking that isn’t helping you transform or become who you want to be? 

What have you collected over the course of your life that you would be better off surrendering? (Emotionally, spiritually, etc.) 

What is the pearl of great price in your mind? What would it look like to change the focus of your ultimate concern to something better (spirituality, wholeness, the Kingdom of God)? 

 

Getting Out of the Hole

Take each week of this series to reflect about the nature of the parables & each parable we cover. Consider taking the following approach:

  1. Commit to reading the parable at least 3 times during the week. 
  2. Each time, meditate on each character. What do they do? What does this reveal about their character? Try to identify with each character – enter into the story.
  3. Reflect on anything that stands out as odd or surprising as the parable is told. Look for anything that seems unexpected or provocative. 
  4. Take time at the end of each session to write down a few words on how & where this parable might challenge you – in your relationships, values, assumptions, worldview, etc. 
  5. Close with prayer. 

Journal, reflect, & pray over these parables. Ask Jesus to help you see where you need to hear his message & change through his stories. Share your experience with your growth group next week!

 

Additional Resources*

Short Stories with Jesus: The Enigmatic Parables of a Controversial Rabbi by Amy-Jill Levine

Stories with Intent: A Comprehensive Guide to the Parables of Jesus by Klyne Snodgrass

Kingdom, Grace, & Judgment in the Parables of Jesus by Robert Farrar Capon

 

Coming Up This Week:* 

Sunday, September 27: Join us for the next week of our series Campfire Stories, where we will be exploring the Parable of the Prodigal Son!
* Please see mye3.org for details.

Message Slides – 09.13.2020

CAMPFIRE STORIES | Wk 3: “The Great Banquet”

Pastor Lori Green | 09.13.2020

Message recordings available at: https://vimeo.com/element3

 

1:

CampfireStories_GREAT BANQUET

 

2:

Reminders:

  1. The parables create parallels between something that’s relatable to us and the Kingdom of God
  2. Jesus’ parables are given to us as something we should work through and wrestle with
  3. The parables are universal & timeless in their truths; their content is highly contextual.  If we read them outside of that context, we risk misunderstanding them. 
  4. The parables are always meant to be provocative.

 

3:

Luke 14:1 (NLT)

 

1 One Sabbath day Jesus went to eat dinner in the home of a leader of the Pharisees, and the people were watching him closely.

 

4:

Luke 14:7-24 (NLT)

When he noticed how the guests picked the places of honor at the table, he told them this parable: “When someone invites you to a wedding feast, do not take the place of honor, for a person more distinguished than you may have been invited. If so, the host who invited both of you will come and say to you, ‘Give this person your seat.’ Then, humiliated, you will have to take the least important place. 10 But when you are invited, take the lowest place, so that when your host comes, he will say to you, ‘Friend, move up to a better place.’ Then you will be honored in the presence of all the other guests. 11 For all those who exalt themselves will be humbled, and those who humble themselves will be exalted.”

12 Then Jesus said to his host, “When you give a luncheon or dinner, do not invite your friends, your brothers or sisters, your relatives, or your rich neighbors; if you do, they may invite you back and so you will be repaid. 13 But when you give a banquet, invite the poor, the crippled, the lame, the blind, 14 and you will be blessed. Although they cannot repay you, you will be repaid at the resurrection of the righteous.”

15 When one of those at the table with him heard this, he said to Jesus, “Blessed is the one who will eat at the feast in the kingdom of God.”

16 Jesus replied: “A certain man was preparing a great banquet and invited many guests. 17 At the time of the banquet he sent his servant to tell those who had been invited, ‘Come, for everything is now ready.’

18 “But they all alike began to make excuses. The first said, ‘I have just bought a field, and I must go and see it. Please excuse me.’

19 “Another said, ‘I have just bought five yoke of oxen, and I’m on my way to try them out. Please excuse me.’

20 “Still another said, ‘I just got married, so I can’t come.’

21 “The servant came back and reported this to his master. Then the owner of the house became angry and ordered his servant, ‘Go out quickly into the streets and alleys of the town and bring in the poor, the crippled, the blind and the lame.’

22 “‘Sir,’ the servant said, ‘what you ordered has been done, but there is still room.’

23 “Then the master told his servant, ‘Go out to the roads and country lanes and compel them to come in, so that my house will be full. 24 I tell you, not one of those who were invited will get a taste of my banquet.’”

 

5:

Status

 

6:

Guest List

 

7:

Kapow

 

8:

  1. Does the picture include people who disagree with you politically?  
  2. Does it include people who are wearing a face mask as well as those who aren’t?
  3. Does it include people who don’t look anything like you?
  4. Does it include those you would consider social outcasts, people who have a different social status than you?

Going Deeper – 09.13.2020

GOING DEEPER

09.13.2020 | CAMPFIRE STORIES | Wk 3: “The Great Banquet”

Join the community and go deeper with this Bible study.

 

Breaking Ground

What is the best meal you’ve ever had? 

 

The Dig

In Luke 14, Jesus is invited to the house of a prominent Pharisee’s for a Sabbath dinner – a supper meant to remind God’s People of the rest & abundance that comes with life in the Kingdom of God.

At the dinner, Jesus sees that 1.) the room is full of the wealthy & esteemed in society; & 2.) they are seating themselves in the places at the table that hold the most honor (jockeying for social position).

Keep this in mind – now read Luke 14:15-24. First, reflect on the fact that Jesus tells this parable in response to his fellow dinner guest’s praise of their Sabbath feast.

What does Jesus see as the difference between his understanding of the Kingdom feast (their current meal) & the banquet that he is bringing into reality?

Next, reflect on the story itself. Each of the first guests refuse the banquet invitation, which would have been a huge statement of disrespect for the host. 

Why do you think the first guests respond the way they do? What do their reasons tell us about why they refuse the invitation? 

Why does the host respond the way he does? What do you notice about the people that he invites instead? 

Close by reflecting on the challenge of this parable

What is provocative about this story? 

How does this undermine our understanding of who is in & out in the eyes of Jesus? How does it challenge our understanding of status, worth, honor, respect, & esteem? 

What might lead you to reject the invitation of spirituality (rest, peace, abundance, love, etc.)? What excuses do you make to not enter the blessings of the Kingdom?

What response do you think Jesus wants us to have at the end of this parable? 

How do you think this story should change us in the here & now? 

 

Getting Out of the Hole

Take each week of this series to reflect about the nature of the parables & each parable we cover. Consider taking the following approach:

  1. Commit to reading the parable at least 3 times during the week. 
  2. Each time, meditate on each character. What do they do? What does this reveal about their character? Try to identify with each character – enter into the story.
  3. Reflect on anything that stands out as odd or surprising as the parable is told. Look for anything that seems unexpected or provocative. 
  4. Take time at the end of each session to write down a few words on how & where this parable might challenge you – in your relationships, values, assumptions, worldview, etc. 
  5. Close with prayer. 

Journal, reflect, & pray over these parables. Ask Jesus to help you see where you need to hear his message & change through his stories. Share your experience with your growth group next week!

 

Additional Resources*

Short Stories with Jesus: The Enigmatic Parables of a Controversial Rabbi by Amy-Jill Levine

Stories with Intent: A Comprehensive Guide to the Parables of Jesus by Klyne Snodgrass

Kingdom, Grace, & Judgment in the Parables of Jesus by Robert Farrar Capon

 

Coming Up This Week:* 

Sunday, September 20: Join us for the next week of our series Campfire Stories, where we will be exploring the Parable of Merchant & the Pearl of Great Price!
* Please see mye3.org for details.

Message Slides – 09.06.2020

CAMPFIRE STORIES | Wk 2: “The Good Samaritan”

Pastor Mike Overstreet | 09.06.2020

Message recordings available at: https://vimeo.com/element3

 

1:

CampfireStories__GOOD SAMARITAN

 

2:

Alien Poster

 

3:

Alien

 

4:

Ground Rules for the Parables:

  1. The parables are stories that create parallels between something understandable to Jesus’ audience & Jesus’ identity, mission, & the Kingdom of God
  2. The parables’ primary purpose is to make us wrestle & ask questions – not give us clear answers. They never have one single, simple interpretation or lesson. 
  3. The parables are universal & timeless in their truths, but highly contextual in their content
  4. The parables are always meant to be provocative in a way that demands a response from their audience. 

 

5:

Luke 10:25-32 (NIV)

 

 

25 On one occasion an expert in the law stood up to test Jesus. “Teacher,” he asked, “what must I do to inherit eternal life?”

26 “What is written in the Law?” he replied. “How do you read it?”

27 He answered, “‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind’; and, ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’”

28 “You have answered correctly,” Jesus replied. “Do this and you will live.”

29 But he wanted to justify himself, so he asked Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?”

30 In reply Jesus said: “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, when he was attacked by robbers. They stripped him of his clothes, beat him and went away, leaving him half dead. 31 A priest happened to be going down the same road, and when he saw the man, he passed by on the other side. 32 So too, a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side.

 

6:

“Their responsibility was to save a life; they failed. Saving a life is so important that Jewish Law mandates that it override every other concern, including keeping the Sabbath… Their responsibility, should the man have died, was to bury the corpse. They failed here as well.” – Amy-Jill Levine

 

7:

Luke 10:33-37 (NIV)

33 But a Samaritan, as he traveled, came where the man was; and when he saw him, he took pity on him. 34 He went to him and bandaged his wounds, pouring on oil and wine. Then he put the man on his own donkey, brought him to an inn and took care of him. 35 The next day he took out two denarii and gave them to the innkeeper. ‘Look after him,’ he said, ‘and when I return, I will reimburse you for any extra expense you may have.’

36 “Which of these three do you think was a neighbor to the man who fell into the hands of robbers?”

37 The expert in the law replied, “The one who had mercy on him.”

Jesus told him, “Go and do likewise.”

 

8:

The Provocative Questions of the Good Samaritan

  1. What does it mean to be a neighbor in Jesus’ Kingdom?
  2. Who is your Samaritan or Other?
  3. Are you willing to be helped by the person you falsely call enemy?

 

9:

“The first question that the priest asked — the first question that the Levite asked was, “If I stop to help this man, what will happen to me?” But then the Good Samaritan came by. And he reversed the question: “If I do not stop to help this man, what will happen to him?” – Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

Going Deeper – 09.06.2020

GOING DEEPER

09.06.2020 | CAMPFIRE STORIES | Wk 2: “The Good Samaritan”

Join the community and go deeper with this Bible study.

 

Breaking Ground

What is a value that you learned from your family that you cherish? Why?

 

The Dig

Read Luke 10:25-29. We are told this Expert/Teacher of the Law is trying to test, or trap, Jesus. 

What about his first question do you think is a trap? 

Why do you think he asks Jesus who is included in the term “neighbor”? What is he getting at? 

Jesus responds by telling the parable of the Good Samaritan. Read Luke 10:30-37. 

Why do you think the Priest & Levite (two positive & esteemed religious figures for Jesus’ audience) move to the other side of the street & pass by without helping

A Samaritan (someone despised as a traitor & corruptor of the Jewish tradition) sees the man, binds his wounds, sacrifices his wealth, & provides for his future care. 

Why does Jesus choose a Samaritan as the character who helps the man?

What is Jesus trying to teach us about what it means to be a true neighbor to others? What values of the Kingdom of God is he asking us to adopt?

Close by reflecting on the challenge of this parable

What do you think is provocative about this story? 

How might it challenge how we see others, ourselves, & our world? Who is your enemy & how might you change how you think about & treat them? 

What response do you think Jesus wants us to have at the end of this parable? 

How do you think this story should change us in the here & now? 

Getting Out of the Hole

Take each week of this series to reflect about the nature of the parables & each parable we cover. Consider taking the following approach:

  1. Commit to reading the parable at least 3 times during the week. 
  2. Each time, meditate on each character. What do they do? What does this reveal about their character? Try to identify with each character – enter into the story.
  3. Reflect on anything that stands out as odd or surprising as the parable is told. Look for anything that seems unexpected or provocative. 
  4. Take time at the end of each session to write down a few words on how & where this parable might challenge you – in your relationships, values, assumptions, worldview, etc. 
  5. Close with prayer. 

Journal, reflect, & pray over these parables. Ask Jesus to help you see where you need to hear his message & change through his stories. Share your experience with your growth group next week!

Additional Resources*

Short Stories with Jesus: The Enigmatic Parables of a Controversial Rabbi by Amy-Jill Levine

Stories with Intent: A Comprehensive Guide to the Parables of Jesus by Klyne Snodgrass

Kingdom, Grace, & Judgment in the Parables of Jesus by Robert Farrar Capon

Coming Up This Week:* 

Sunday, September 13: Join us for the next week of our series Campfire Stories, where we will be exploring the Parable of the Great Banquet!
* Please see mye3.org for details.

Going Deeper – 08.30.2020

GOING DEEPER

08.30.2020 | CAMPFIRE STORIES | Wk 1: “The Workers in the Vineyard”

Join the community and go deeper with this Bible study.

 

Breaking Ground

What was the worst job you’ve ever had? Why?

 

The Dig

Begin by reflecting on the “Four Ground Rules For Reading the Parables” from Sunday’s sermon:

  1. The parables use short, fictional stories to draw parallels between something we understand & Jesus, his mission, & the Kingdom of God.
  2. The parables seek to make us wrestle, not give us clear answers or simple moral/theological lessons. They are stories that never have one, simple, clear interpretation.
  3. The parables are universal & timeless in their truths/themes, but highly contextual in their content.
  4. The parables are always meant to be provocative & they demand a response from the audience. 

Do any of these rules clash with how you’ve approached or been taught the parables in the past? 

Why do you think Jesus uses stories rather than lectures to teach some of these big truths about himself & God? 

Read Matthew 20:1-12. First, reflect on the characters. 

What are your first impressions of the Landowner? 

What do you make of the first workers hired? Why are they resentful at the end? What is the substance of their complaint? Do you relate to these characters? 

Next, read Matthew 20:13-16.

Why does the Landowner respond the way he does? How do you feel about his response? 

Close by reflecting on the challenge of this parable

What is provocative about this story? 

How might it challenge how we see others, ourselves, & our world? THINK: where we find value, our understanding of fairness, generosity, greed, etc. 

What response do you think Jesus wants us to have at the end of this parable? 

How do you think this story should change us in the here & now? 

 

Getting Out of the Hole

Take each week of this series to reflect about the nature of the parables & each parable we cover. Consider taking the following approach:

  1. Commit to reading the parable at least 3 times during the week. 
  2. Each time, meditate on each character. What do they do? What does this reveal about their character? Try to identify with each character – enter into the story.
  3. Reflect on anything that stands out as odd or surprising as the parable is told. Look for anything that seems unexpected or provocative. 
  4. Take time at the end of each session to write down a few words on how & where this parable might challenge you – in your relationships, values, assumptions, worldview, etc. 
  5. Close with prayer. 

Journal, reflect, & pray over these parables. Ask Jesus to help you see where you need to hear his message & change through his stories. Share your experience with your growth group next week!

 

Additional Resources*

Short Stories with Jesus: The Enigmatic Parables of a Controversial Rabbi by Amy-Jill Levine

Stories with Intent: A Comprehensive Guide to the Parables of Jesus by Klyne Snodgrass

Kingdom, Grace, & Judgment in the Parables of Jesus by Robert Farrar Capon

 

Coming Up This Week:* 

Sunday, September 6: Join us for the next week of our series Campfire Stories, where we will be exploring the Parable of the Good Samaritan!
* Please see mye3.org for details.

Message Slides – 08.30.2020

CAMPFIRE STORIES | Wk 1: “The Workers in the Vineyard”

Pastor Mike Overstreet | 08.30.2020

Message recordings available at: https://vimeo.com/element3

 

1:

CampfireStories__WORKERS IN VINEYARD

 

2:

Ground Rules for the Parables:

  1. The parables are stories that create parallels between something understandable to Jesus’ audience & Jesus’ identity, mission, & the Kingdom of God
  2. The parables’ primary purpose is to make us wrestle & ask questions – not give us clear answers. They never have one single, simple interpretation or lesson. 
  3. The parables are universal & timeless in their truths, but highly contextual in their content
  4. The parables are always meant to be provocative in a way that demands a response from their audience. 

 

3:

Matthew 20:1-12 (NIV)

“For the kingdom of heaven is like a landowner who went out early in the morning to hire workers for his vineyard. He agreed to pay them a denarius for the day and sent them into his vineyard.

“About nine in the morning he went out and saw others standing in the marketplace doing nothing. He told them, ‘You also go and work in my vineyard, and I will pay you whatever is right.’ So they went.

“He went out again about noon and about three in the afternoon and did the same thing. About five in the afternoon he went out and found still others standing around. He asked them, ‘Why have you been standing here all day long doing nothing?’

“‘Because no one has hired us,’ they answered.

“He said to them, ‘You also go and work in my vineyard.’

“When evening came, the owner of the vineyard said to his foreman, ‘Call the workers and pay them their wages, beginning with the last ones hired and going on to the first.’

“The workers who were hired about five in the afternoon came and each received a denarius. 10 So when those came who were hired first, they expected to receive more. But each one of them also received a denarius. 11 When they received it, they began to grumble against the landowner. 12 ‘These who were hired last worked only one hour,’ they said, ‘and you have made them equal to us who have borne the burden of the work and the heat of the day.’

 

4:

Mr Grumble

 

5:

Matthew 20:13-16 (NIV)

13 “But he answered one of them, ‘I am not being unfair to you, friend. Didn’t you agree to work for a denarius? 14 Take your pay and go. I want to give the one who was hired last the same as I gave you. 15 Don’t I have the right to do what I want with my own money? Or are you envious because I am generous?’

16 “So the last will be first, and the first will be last.”

 

6:

The first workers hired don’t resent the Landowner because he was being “unfair.” They resent being treated as equals with people they believe are less deserving than themselves & they lament the ability of their fellow workers to live

 

7:

THE LAYERS OF THE PARABLE

  • THE LANDOWNER – God seeks us out where we are at & His love/care is not divisible because it’s poured out infinitely on everyone. 
  • THE LAST WORKERS HIRED – We do not determine whether someone is worthy of God’s love, care, or invitation. He has declared that His Kingdom is being generously, freely & equally given, which is His right
  • THE FIRST WORKERS HIRED – We often see our world through a lens of merity & scarcity, which produces jealousy, resentment, & greed

 

8:

THE CHALLENGE OF THE PARABLE

  • It challenges us to realize that God’s Kingdom is concerned with what God declares is right, not what we think is fair. It’s about everyone getting enough, not us getting more
  • It challenges us to develop a mindset of abundance, not scarcity. 
  • It challenges us to adopt the new values of the Kingdom by recognizing & repenting from where our broken attitudes of “fairness” have cost our neighbor. 
  • It challenges us to change how we treat other people in the here & now through our Godlike generosity – especially those we want to see as “less deserving” than ourselves.

 

9:

CampfireStories__WORKERS IN VINEYARD

Message Slides – 08.23.2020

THEREFORE | Wk 9: “Therefore Be The Church”

Pastor Lori Green | 08.23.2020

Message recordings available at: https://vimeo.com/element3

 

1:

 

THEREFORE_Sidewalk-02

 

2:

The Values of Element3 Church

  1. Growth – “When the Holy Spirit is moving in and among us, we embrace a life of perpetual growth.” 
  2. Humility – “When the Holy Spirit is moving in and among us, we embrace & live out a life of design & intention.” 
  3. Intentional Design – “When the Holy Spirit is moving in and among us, we embrace & live out a life of design & intention.” 
  4. Trust – “When the Holy Spirit is moving in & among us, we trust God to lead, provide for, & guide us, & we trust each other to bring their best to the community.”
  5. Make Room – “When the Holy Spirit is moving in & among us, we choose to make room for others.”
  6. Authenticity – “When the Holy Spirit is moving in & among us, we live authentic lives, to ourselves & to others.”
  7. Grace In All Things – “When the Holy Spirit is moving in, among, & through us, we experience & give grace in all things.”

 

 

 

Going Deeper – 08.23.2020

GOING DEEPER

08.23.2020 | THEREFORE | Wk 9: “Therefore Be The Church”

Join the community and go deeper with this Bible study.

 

Breaking Ground

Share about how you came to E3. How did you find the church? How long have you been here? Why did you keep coming back?

 

The Dig

This week, take time to reflect on the Therefore series. 

Have you enjoyed this series? What has stuck with you the most from it?

Have you gained any new insights on the role of community values over the course of the series? 

Reflect on the Seven Core Values of E3:

  1. Growth – “When the Holy Spirit is moving in and among us, we embrace a life of perpetual growth.” 
  2. Humility – “When the Holy Spirit is moving in and among us, we embrace & live out a life of design & intention.” 
  3. Intentional Design – “When the Holy Spirit is moving in and among us, we embrace & live out a life of design & intention.” 
  4. Trust – “When the Holy Spirit is moving in & among us, we trust God to lead, provide for, & guide us, & we trust each other to bring their best to the community.”
  5. Make Room – “When the Holy Spirit is moving in & among us, we choose to make room for others.”
  6. Authenticity – “When the Holy Spirit is moving in & among us, we live authentic lives, to ourselves & to others.”
  7. Grace In All Things – “When the Holy Spirit is moving in, among, & through us, we experience & give grace in all things.”

Which of these values have you found most impactful? Why? 

Which of these values do you find easiest to live out? Why?

Do you think any of these values are more or less important to a church’s health & ability to live out Christ’s story well? Why?

Which of these values do you find hardest to live out? Why?

Which have you found most at E3? Least? 

How do you think these values can be fostered more deeply at E3? What do you think you can do to see that happen at our church? 

 

Getting Out of the Hole

Take this time to reflect on the values that we have covered in this series. 

Go back through the What It Means & How We Live It Out sections for each value. Note anything that stands out to you in this season at E3 & write down how you might grow these values at E3. 

Share your insights with your growth group next week!

 

Additional Resources*

To Change the World: The Irony, Tragedy, & Possibility of Christianity in the Late Modern World by James D. Hunter

Resident Alien by Stanley Hauerwas

A Community of Character by Stanley Hauerwas

The New Testament & the People of God by NT Wright

Organizational Culture & Leadership by Edgar Schein

Leading Change by John Kotter

Coming Up This Week:* 

Sunday, August 30: Join us for the first week of our series Campfire Stories, where we will be exploring the parables of Jesus! 
* Please see mye3.org for details.